mollaythesassay:

puta-madre91:

Our psychological state allows us to see only what we want/need/feel to see at a particular time. What five words do you see?

this scares me a little

zombieboobabe:

Ryan and his “lost” footage. At least Lindsay is always there to save the day.

// Posted 2 days ago with 3,518 notes - reblog

sweet-bitsy:

lady-fett:

please enjoy this video of an action packed, high speed fight between two cats.

GRUESOME VIOLET ADRENALINE PUMPING!!!!

// Posted 2 days ago with 43,835 notes - reblog

jaelafish:

whatacutemayor:

thetownofmacaron:

THIS IS THE PERFECT DESCRIPTION OF ME

This is my life

I know this feel

// Posted 4 days ago with 95,596 notes - reblog

Ryan: I don’t actually like to do horrible things to you. I just like to tease doing horrible things to you.
Gavin: You just like to tease it?
Ryan: Yeah.

// Posted 4 days ago with 6,163 notes - reblog

panbanrich:

So I was poking around the Tales of Link mobile app files and it has card images for Lloyd & Colette in their noble outfits. :D

// Posted 5 days ago with 761 notes - reblog

Kratcanons - Old age, Obscurity and Storytelling

ninthcompanion:

So, this is one of the most headcanon-based of these posts, but I was playing through the starts of Symphonia and DotNW for the sake of getting to experience the glorious HD before having to leave it behind for a couple of months when this thought happened - a thought about exactly what happened to Kratos after he left with Derris-Kharlan.

We know that his goal on the comet of doom is to assist the people who became lifeless beings thanks to Cruxis’ reign. However, we also know that he is not alive at the time of Tales of Phantasia. Dhaos knows nothing about him, so we can also assume that he has been gone for quite a long time.

So what happened? Here’s what I think.

I think that Kratos, after having dealt with anything Cruxis left in Welgaia that should not be left to people, helped the Lifeless Beings to come back to themselves and establish a community. I feel that he guided them in finding their own leaders and their own laws.

For a while, I think he remained on call afterwards. He dealt with conflicts that arose as best he could. He dealt with unrest as best he could. He was not their leader, but he remained an adviser long after a suitable governing body had been created.

As the years went on, Kratos gradually pulled back until he no longer appeared where any decisions were made and simply lurked in the background, watching but never acting unless called upon.

He withdrew fully, lived nearby and made sure that the next couple of leaders knew where he was should they require guidance. And as years past and the knowledge of his presence was not needed and faded, Kratos left.

He removed and destroyed his Cruxis Crystal and he moved to the outskirts of a small settlement, where he lived alone and aged until he became an old man.

The narration at the start of the game? That is Kratos on Derris-Kharlan. He lives undisturbed. Nobody knows who he is. He is just an old man who rarely makes the effort to speak with anybody, except when seated on a bench watching the world pass him by, when children come to ask him for stories.

So Kratos tells them stories. He tells them about the Goddess and the Chosen, about Spiritua, about Summon Spirits and heroes. He tells the stories he heard as child and the ones he watched unfold. He tells the best stories.

The ones the children like the most are the ones about the red swordsman. Those are the best stories. But when Kratos tells them, he sometimes just stops and looks through the children not at them, like he’s seeing something else. Sometimes he smiles a little and sometimes he looks sad.

Sometimes the children help him when this happens, by suggesting what could happen next. But Kratos usually stops them.

"Ah, would it not be interesting were that how the tale truly unfolded? But here is the truth to the tale."

Their parents tell them that it’s just fantasy, a load of campfire tales and fairy stories. But Kratos winks and taps his nose.

He tells the best stories because every story he tells is true.

Within a couple of generations, Kratos’ stories are mostly forgotten, but there are still a couple of bedtime stories about a red swordsman performing various heroic acts. Even if they aren’t the true ones.

// Posted 5 days ago with 39 notes - reblog
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